Mediterranean 411

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If there’s one way of eating that is widely acclaimed for its health benefits, it’s the Mediterranean diet. U.S. News & World Report ranked the Mediterranean diet No. 1 on its 40 Best Diets Overall list for 2022, citing a “host of health benefits, including weight loss, heart and brain health, cancer prevention, and diabetes prevention and control.”
More of an eating pattern than a calorie-restricted diet, the Mediterranean regimen emphasizes lots of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, seeds, and fish, with liberal use of olive oil, a moderate amount of dairy foods, and a low amount of red meat — a way of eating common in Mediterranean countries such as Spain, Italy, and Greece.
Processed foods that are high in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and unhealthy fats (think: chips, cookies, cake, white bread, white rice, and the like) are avoided. But a little red wine with meals is a delightful option! The Mediterranean way of eating focuses on enjoying food and drink with loved ones, along with being physically active and always keeping moderation in mind.
Join us to learn more about the Mediterranean way of eating and make a delicious meal to enjoy! This is a one time class. However, if enough people are interested, we can discuss beginning the 6 week Med Instead of Meds series.
Date: Tuesday, January 26, 2023
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: Tyrrell County Cooperative Extension Office, 407 Martha Street, Columbia NC 27925
Cost: $10 (payable by cash or check on day of class)
Registration due: January 23, 2023
CONTACT Dee Furlough : 225-796-1581 or dee_furlough@ncsu.edu